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Spark your divine genius to create art

What if your creativity came from a place greater than you—a source of inspiration that never let you down?

Ancient Greeks and Romans believed that art was born out of a divine conduit—or genius. People weren’t geniuses but tapped a divine spirit to create their art.

In Plato’s time, the concept of creativity didn’t exist. Instead, Greeks saw art as a form of discovery through a muse that mediated inspiration from the Gods—a benevolent guiding spirit linked to the divine.

The idea of a muse may be why some artists think they can’t create until they’re inspired.

Don’t wait for your muse to appear. Call it out.

Something magical happens when we put an intention out into the world to create. Dorothea Brande knew this when she said, “Act boldly and unseen forces will come to your aid.”

Greek philosophers, including Plato saw art not as an act of creation but as a form of discovery. And isn’t that why we write—to discover? We write to discover what we know or think about something, what will happen next, and to find meaning.

Have you been waiting for inspiration to strike? Light the flame yourself by invoking your higher creative spirit. Create a relationship by giving your muse a name.

Carry a notebook as a promise to your muse. Your notebook signifies an intention that you are open to observing and noting images, conversations, and ideas for your writing.

How do you connect with your divine inspiration? Tell us about your creative process by leaving a comment.

One Comment Post a comment
  1. I don’t think I really have any divine inspiration. I just outline my novels and then slog through to the finish line. But so far, it’s working. 😄

    May 19, 2018

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